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Gliss
Kick in Your Heart
by Katie Sauro

Every once in a great while, we stumble upon a mystery so unnerving we can only theorize as to any possible explanations. 

What is the meaning of life?  Do aliens exist? Just how in the hell does Martin Klingman manage to stay at the exact same vocal pitch through seven songs, despite the musical crescendos crashing down around him?

I have no idea how he does it, nor do I care, because it’s not a bad thing. Klingman, lead singer of Los Angeles-based Gliss, has a breathy delivery, almost a whisper, which seems to reverberate between the jangly guitar work, heavy bass lines, and pounding drums of his bandmates, creating a dark, ethereal atmosphere that is equal parts endearing and hypnotizing.

Gliss, consisting of Klingman, David Reiss and Victoria Cecelia, recently released their debut EP,
Kick in Your Heart, which transcends traditional bedroom indie pop with cutting guitars and a metal edge. Highlights on the album include “Halfway Gone,” which utilizes a rolling Breeders-like bass line surrounded by a pure pop background of harmonizing vocals, keyboards, and simple guitar rhythms. On “Peeping Tom,” Klingman’s sultry whisper sounds slightly like Shirley Manson on “#1 Crush,” his voice dripping with sensuality and passion.

Most of the songs on the album are somewhat slow and atmospheric, but there is one track, “The Quitter,” that combines grinding metal guitar, psychedelia, and a pop-punk progression that sounds completely different from the songs on the rest of their album, yet is so strikingly familiar that it doesn’t sound out of place at all. 

The stellar performances by all three musicians make this album worth a listen, and fans of Garbage and the Raveonettes will be instantly smitten with this charming indie trio.

The debut full-length from Gliss is set to be released later this year.